Pharmacist hopes to get life-saving medicine to every home in Adel community

If there’s anything Leslie Herron, owner of Sumpter Pharmacy, loves, it’s Adel and the people who live there. That’s part of why she hopes to bring Narcan, which is used to treat narcotic overdoses in emergencies, into the homes of everyone in the community. The other reason is that she knows how life-saving it can be while waiting for first responders to arrive and help. When people think of the causes of overdoses, many first think of heroin or fentanyl. However, overdose does not discriminate. “When you’re in pain, you don’t think clearly,” Herron said. “So it’s very easy to lose track of how much medicine you’ve taken.” That’s when Herron says it’s time to break out the Narcan nasal spray. “It just has to be absorbed through the nasal passages, because that’s one of the quickest ways to get into the bloodstream,” Herron said. A law passed in 2016 allows pharmacists in Iowa to dispense Narcan to patients over the age of 18. hopes to get them into every Adel house because Narcan reverses the effects of an opioid. “So the opioids come in, you take them, and they bind to a receptor in your body, and then they do their thing,” Herron said. “What Narcan does is it comes in and just knocks that opioid off the receptor like it’s not there anymore.” “It may be in your house,” Deborah Krauss said, referring to an overdose. Krauss is the director of the Iowa Harm Reduction Coalition. says she knows how indiscriminate overdose is. Like Herron, she thinks it’s important for people to reduce the stigma around Narcan, because anyone can be in need or save a life. “There are a lot of people who have never touched a drug in their life and they wear Narcan because you could save a life,” Krauss said.

If there’s anything Leslie Herron, owner of Sumpter Pharmacy, loves, it’s Adel and the people who live there. That’s part of why she hopes to bring Narcan, which is used to treat narcotic overdoses in emergencies, into the homes of everyone in the community.

The other reason is that she knows how life-saving it can be while waiting for first responders to arrive and help.

When people think of the causes of overdoses, many first think of heroin or fentanyl. However, overdose does not discriminate.

“When you’re in pain, you don’t think clearly,” Herron said. “So it’s very easy to lose track of how much medicine you’ve taken.”

That’s when Herron says it’s time to break out the Narcan nasal spray.

“It just needs to be absorbed through the nasal passages because it’s one of the quickest ways to get into the bloodstream,” Herron said.

A law passed in 2016 allows pharmacists in Iowa to dispense Narcan to patients over the age of 18.

Herron says she hopes to get them into every Adel house because Narcan reverses the effects of an opioid.

“So the opioids come in, you take them, and they bind to a receptor in your body, and then they do their thing,” Herron said. “What Narcan does is it comes in and just knocks that opioid off the receptor like it’s not there anymore.”

“It may be in your house,” Deborah Krauss said, referring to an overdose.

Krauss is the director of the Iowa Harm Reduction Coalition.

“It could be that you know your nephew, your niece or your child,” she said.

Krauss says she knows how indiscriminate an overdose is. Like Herron, she thinks it’s important for people to reduce the stigma around Narcan, because anyone can be in need or save a life.

“There are a lot of people who have never touched a drug in their life and they wear Narcan because you could save a life,” Krauss said.

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